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Hit-and-Run Law in Colorado

By Timothy Bussey on May 1, 2017

hit-and-runThere are many different rules and laws governing traffic and traffic accidents in Colorado. Unfortunately, these laws do not and simply cannot eliminate all car accidents. If you get into a car accident, you have certain duties that you must fulfill. Failing to fulfill your obligations after a car accident could subject you to the loss of your driver’s license and/or, even worse, jail time.

If you are involved in a car accident, regardless of whose fault the accident is, you will be best served by contacting The Bussey Law Firm, P.C. Our team, lead by Timothy R. Bussey, has years of experience handling car accidents on both the criminal and the civil side. Call today if you’ve been in a car accident at (719) 475-2555.

Your Obligations Following a Car Accident

Regardless of whether the accident is one car or more, there will likely be property damage. Colorado Revised Statute § 42-4-1602 lays out what you, as the driver, are required to do if you are involved in a traffic accident where there is only property damage.

If you are driving and get into a traffic accident, you shall immediately stop your car or truck at the scene of the accident. If you cannot stop immediately at the scene, you must stop as close as possible and return to the scene immediately. This is required of all drivers unless the accident took place on the traveled portion, median, or ramp of a divided highway and your vehicle can be driven away from the scene.

After the accident occurs you are required to exchange information with the other involved drivers. This information includes your name, address, registration number of the vehicle you are driving, and possibly showing the other driver your driver’s license. See C.R.S. § 42-4-1603(1).

In addition to your obligations to the other drivers involved in an accident, you must report the accident to law enforcement. As you remain on scene and after exchanging required information with the other drivers, you must contact the nearest police authority and provide the police with your location. C.R.S. § 42-4-1606(1). If the police direct you to remain on scene you must remain at that location until the police complete their investigation there.

If You Hit and Run…

If you do not fulfill your obligations to the other drivers or to the police, you may be charged with a class 2 traffic misdemeanor for Duty to Report Accidents pursuant to C.R.S. § 42-4-1606, Accident Involving Damage–Duty pursuant to C.R.S. § 42-4-1602, and/or Duty to Give Notice, Information, and Aid pursuant to C.R.S. § 42-4-1603. A conviction for any of these offenses will result in 12 points being reported to the Department of Motor Vehicles. A conviction resulting in 12 points will trigger an action by the DMV and will likely result in a license suspension being imposed for excessive points.

In addition to a license suspension, these charges do carry the potential for a jail sentence. See C.R.S. §42-4-1701(3). If you or someone you know has been charged and/or cited for leaving the scene of an accident, hit and run, duty to report accidents, etc., you want to have an experienced Colorado legal team working for you. The loss of your driver’s license can be stressful enough without the added exposure to jail time. Call our Colorado traffic violation attorneys at The Bussey Law Firm, P.C., today to schedule a consultation and take the first step towards protecting your driver’s license and your liberty. The number to dial is (719) 475-2555.

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